6 Things You Didn’t Know About Cherry Blossoms

With the Japanese season fast approaching we got a little curious about those pretty pink trees. Take a look at some interesting facts about Cherry Blossoms.

While Cherry Blossom season doesn’t start for us Sydney siders until late August – early September, Japan is about to bloom the worlds most instagrammable trees. We’re pretty curious to know a little more about these beauties caz we’re planning something pretty special for you guys come September (stay tuned). but in the meantime, we’re going to teach you all these is to know about the famed Cherry Blossom tree.

Beautiful pink cherry blossom trees

NATIONAL FLOWER

The Cherry Blossom is the Japanese national flower. It is called ‘Sakura’ in Japanese and symbolizes renewal and hope.

Sakura flavoured pink macarons styled on a table

EDIBLE

The beautiful pink flower petals are in fact edible. They mainly come salted and can flavour a variety of things from cookies to rice to tea.

Washington lined with beautiful cherry blossom trees in peak bloom

A GIFT TO WASHINGTON

According to the National Geographic, Washington D.C’s Cherry Blossom trees were a gift from Tokyo Mayor, Yukio Ozaki to then president Taft. The idea was born to improve relations between the two countries and the initial plan for 300 trees quickly ballooned to well over 2,000.

PICINIC TRADITION

We all love a good picnic, but in Japan it is a century old well-known tradition. Picnicking under a Cherry Blossom tree is called ‘Hanami’, which means flower viewing in Japanese.

A BEAUTIFUL CHERRY BLOSSOM TREE STANDING ALONE ON A HILL

THEY BIG

According to Country Living, the average Japanese cherry blossom tree is around 25 feet tall. However with proper care, these beauties can grow to reach 75 feet!

VERY SEASONAL

The Cherry Blossom tree is very temperamental making it very difficult to predict blooming seasons. Each year their optimal blooming season can change, depending on the weather. You’ve also got to be quick to catch these beauties!most trees only flower for about a week.

Can’t make it to Japan to see these beauties? Us either, so we’ll settle for a Japanese meal instead. Book in here

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